Kettlebell Kings Blog

Kettlebell Foundations: Kettlebell Squats

Posted by Kettlebell Kings on Sep 10, 2017 5:34:16 PM

By Doug Fioranelli

In the first article and video of the Hardstyle Series for Kettlebell Kings I broke down all the essential kettlebell deadlift movement nuances and their progressions.  The deadlift is the foundation where the hip hinge pattern is established.  This hip hinge pattern is essential to build a strong posterior chain and to learn how to move the body properly when we get to the hardstyle swing.

However, before we get to the swing, which will come in the next instalment, let’s strengthen up those legs and core a bit more by learning how to properly squat with the kettlebell. We have published the full post on our main site at https://www.kettlebellkings.com:

 

Read the full post HERE

 

Make sure to subscribe to our blog through the form on the right side or at the bottom on mobile devices. Get updates when more content like this is published!
Read More

Topics: Kettlebell Movements, Hardstyle Training, Kettlebell Squats, Kettlebell Foundations

Hardstyle 101: The Press

Posted by Kettlebell Kings on Aug 27, 2017 6:14:25 PM

In our first Hardstyle 101 post with Zack Henderson he broke down the Kettlebell Snatch. If this is your first time reading in the Hardstyle 101 series, we recommend you start there as Zack covers a couple of introduction items other than just the execise itself. In this post, Zack breaks down The Press.

Zack has previously shown us how applying kettlebell movements can help improve your power lifting numbers.  We love working with Zack because of his knowledge and understanding of not only kettlebells movements but how they can be applied to different aspects of working out as well as being able to thoroughly explain them. 

by Zack Henderson: 

The Press

The one-arm military press is one of the best places to practice the subtleties of tension techniques and experience the immediate difference in performance.

Once in the racked position, the goal of tension is to provide a stable “platform” for the press and keep the shoulder in a safe position.

Here, the aforementioned “active static” idea is applied practically through the entire body.  The toes grip the ground with the intention of “burning a hole in the floor” in order to promote a sense of rootedness.  The quads, glutes, and abs, aka “The Holy Trinity of Strength,” are contracted to keep the pelvis and low back locked.

But why involve the entire body to such a degree when the military press is a simple shoulder exercise?

Because this is the groundwork for learning how to channel your strength.

Such an approach runs in close parallel to many philosophies in powerlifting training.  Working high tension techniques with submaximal weights better prepares one for handling heavier loads.  When you treat your warm-ups like max attempts, that new PR will feel like home.

Once the skills are learned, you can begin to dial in the “sweet spot” - the amount of tension needed to lift the weight without going overboard and slowing yourself down.

Watch a demo of The Press below! Make sure to suscribe for most posts like this breaking down technique by entering your email in the pop up, field on the right on desktops or below on mobile!

Read More

Topics: kettlebell press, Hardstyle Training

Hardstyle 101: The Snatch

Posted by Kettlebell Kings on Aug 27, 2017 5:24:39 PM

We are excited to have Zack Henderson break down some more kettlebell movements for us. Zack has previously shown us how applying kettlebell movements can help improve your power lifting numbers.  We love working with Zack because of his knowledge and understanding of not only kettlebells movements but how they can be applied to different aspects of working out as well as being able to thoroughly explain them. In this post, Zack breaks down the hardstyle snatch and our quick follow up he will break down The Press next. 

by Zack Henderson: 

I support the swinging, cleaning, jerking, snatching and lifting of the mighty kettlebell in all its forms.  The human body is capable of expressing strength and movement in infinite ways.  Any resistance we use, kettlebell or otherwise, is just a way to explore and develop those capabilities.

There is no “wrong” way to exercise.  If it hurts or otherwise damages your health, that’s abuse, not exercise.  Unfortunately, we live in a world where many people construct artificial divides and argue nuance just to promote their own cause.  Judgement from a high horse is little more than a sign of insecurity or ignorance. 

Before we dive in, understand that I am in not writing as a representative of any training organization.  Rather, I’m sharing my own perspective on a style that I’ve found valuable in my own fitness pursuits and my approach to training others.

I will spare you the history lesson and get right down to the meat and potatoes of what hardstyle means in the context of kettlebell training.

The ballistics are treated with high acceleration and the grinds are treated with tension.  At all other times, your priority to to stay as loose and fresh as possible.

The rest is simply how these ideas can be scaled to different goals and skill levels. 

Let us take a look at how hardstyle principles are applied in action.

 Read and watch the full breakdown below!

Read More

Topics: Kettlebell Snatch, Hardstyle Training

Kettlebell Foundations: Kettlebell Deadlift Progressions

Posted by Kettlebell Kings on Aug 16, 2017 4:36:38 PM

We are excited to work with Dough Fioranelli, owner of Rise Above Performance Training on a super informative series about hardstyle kettlebell movements. There are essentially two different schools of thought in kettlebell training and both are great, we have covered a number of Kettlebell Sport type movements and will be working to bring you more of the hardstyle movements which most people are familiar with. In the first part of the series, Doug goes through an awesome progression of Kettlebell Deadlifts and variations designed to improve your overall lift and performance. Doug created and awesome video demonstration and explanation of all the movements which you can watch below!

By Doug Fioranelli

There are two prominent types of kettlebell training that serve the trainee with two completely different purposes.  The first type of training you have seen all over Facebook; athletes moving those different colored bells overhead for five to ten minutes sets often having the look of pain on their face.  The other type reflects a much more common training setting where moving an iron ball with a handle might seem a bit foreign to the new trainee from traditional weights and machines. 

The latter reflects a more hardstyle or foundational form of kettlebell training and, in my opinion, is the most suited for new trainees, athletes, coaches and trainers looking to learn and teach others.

In this Hardstyle Series for Kettlebell Kings I will completely breakdown all of the essential kettlebell exercises in article and video format so you can add this tool, with confidence, to your training arsenal and achieve the results you are looking for.

For this first installment, we are going over the foundational kettlebell deadlift.

Proper Set Up and Patterning:

The hardstyle deadlift is one of my favorite exercises for many reasons.  First, I believe the set-up is much easier to achieve than a traditional barbell deadlift because the kettlebell can sit easily between your feet whereas the barbell deadlift is in front of the body and maintaining proper back alignment during the set- up is much more difficult, especially for the new trainee.

Secondly, it is a great way to teach someone how to hinge at their hips which has many benefits including: increased glute and hamstring activation for muscle building and proper hip drive which is important for proper execution of other kettlebell movement as well as enhanced sports performance.

  • Set the kettlebell on the floor in-between your knees and ankles with a slightly wider-than-shoulder-width stance.
  • Grab the handle firmly and connect your biceps to the side of your body to set your back so it is straight with your chest up, shoulder blades together and lower back arched (not rounded) and head neutral with the chin slightly retracted.  If you visualize a clock you want your head positioned at 10 o’clock and your hips at the 4 o’clock position.
  • Anchor your feet firmly into the ground, tighten your core, squeeze your glutes and drive the body up by pushing the floor away with your feet until you are standing up straight with your hips underneath you at the top.

Read More Below! Make sure to subscribe to our blog through the form on the right side or at the bottom on mobile devices. Get updates when more content like this is published!


Read More

Topics: Kettlebell Movements, Deadlifts, Hardstyle Training, Kettlebell Foundations