Kettlebell Kings Blog

Learn Proper Breathing Techniques For Kettlebell Sport From a World Champion

Posted by Kettlebell Kings on Sep 12, 2017 5:40:15 PM

Kimberly Fox is a World Champion kettlebell lifter and member of Team USA. She will be representing Team USA at the IUKL World Championships in Seoul, South Korea this year which are the world championships for Kettlebell Sport in which the best lifters from all of the world compete.  We asked Kimberly if she would share some of her best advice and tips for Kettlebell Sport training with us leading up to the World Championships and she was very happy to help.

This is an exciting year for women in Kettlebell Sport because this is the first year women will be competing in Two Arm Long Cycle.  Kim competes with TWO 24 kilogram competition kettlebells and will be going for personal and world records in reps in South Korea. The top kettlebell athletes in the world will be competing in Seoul to represent their countries and Kim has some awesome goals we wanted to learn about. 

Additionally, we were able to ask her a handful of questions to try and learn more about how she started competing in Kettlebell Sport as well as her goals for herself.  You can watch the full video below in which she goes over proper breathing technique and answers our questions about her kettlebell background. 

Q. How long have you been training with Kettlebells?

A. I started training kettlebell 5 years ago.

Q. How were you introduced to kettlebells?

Q. I was mostly doing some hybrid hard style technique I had learned from YouTube videos. A friend, Matt Sanders, saw that I was really interested in kettlebells and told me about GS. I was instantly hooked. When I first started training, I used other people's goals to set my own. But you can never truly grow and develop unless you are true to your own goals.

Q. What are your goals for your kettlebell training?

A. My current goals are to push myself to where I could not think I could go. Kettlebell sport is the opportunity to push myself to a new level at each training session. At some point that level will be 70 Long Cycle reps with 24kg bells and then to win at the IUKL worlds in Korea. 

  

WATCH KIM EXPLAIN PROPER BREATHING TECHNIQUES BELOW AS WELL AS THE REMAINDER OF OUR INTERVIEW AND HOW YOU CAN HELP SUPPORT KIM REPRESENT TEAM USA AT THE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS.

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Topics: kettlebell sport, Kettlebell Technique, Team USA

Steve Cotter Demonstrates Unlimited Kettlebell Press Variations

Posted by Kettlebell Kings on Feb 13, 2017 8:54:26 PM

We are really excited to announce the beginning of our partnership with Steve Cotter & IKFF!

Kettlebell Kings and Steve Cotter are now working together to provide amazing content designed to help you get maximal use out of your kettlebell.  Steve Cotter is a dynamic force in the world of fitness, sports conditioning, and mind-body practice. A global pioneer in Kettlebell training education, Steve has personally instructed thousands of fitness professionals around the world through his International Kettlebell and Fitness Federation(IKFF), which he founded in 2008.

Photo credit: Photographer: Taco Fleur, www.cavemantraining.com

 Also, our personal favorite, Steve is on the Men's Health Magazine 'The 100 Fittest Men of All Time' list. When we started our business in 2012, we obviously were well aware of Steve and we could not be more happy to be working with him and providing him another outlet for teaching the greatness of kettlebell to the world. You can read and watch more kettlebell content by Steve Cotter through the links at the bottom of this article. 

In our first piece together, Steve will be breaking down The Kettlebell Press. The fascinating thing which Steve will demonstrate in the video below is that even using the same weighted kettlebell you can do quite a number of press variations which will increase the difficulty of the press. So, you do not need to always increase your weight, by practicing some of these you can continue to get a great workout with one kettlebell. But by all means, buy more Kettlebell Kings!

 

WATCH THE DEMONSTRATION  BELOW!

IF YOU PREFER, YOU CAN WATCH THE CLIP RATHER THAN READ!

 

KETTLEBELL PRESS VARIATIONS

Steve discusses the concept of 'progressive overload', once your body is used to certain stress you have to increase the difficulty to continue to progress. You can do this by adding weight, reps or increase speed. With kettlebells because of the unique design there are other ways to progressively overload by changing the exercise. Any movement can be made more difficult by how you hold the kettlebell. All of these movements are performed with the same weight kettlebell.

1 ) Military Press or Strict Press ( at 1:50)

Bring the bell to your chest, feet together. Press the bell upward. In this method you are strictly pressing the bell without any momentum from the rest of your body.

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2 ) The Push Press (at 2:15)

With your feet shoulder with apart, load the legs by dipping like a squat and extending the legs while you press in order to give yourself some momentum pressing the bell upward with the legs. 

3 ) The Jerk or The Jerk Press (at 2:35)

Load the legs like in the Push Press, but do an under squat and drop under the bell while pressing before standing completely up. This creates momentum with the legs and you actually get under the bell while pressing it in order to make it easier.

 

WATCH MORE BELOW!

 

4 ) The Side Press at (at 2:51)

If you are finding the kettlebell to heavy for one of the strict presses, you can utilize the side press.  Lever using your hips by pushing your hip under the bell (demonstrated) and push your body away while pressing and then straighten up under the bell after pressing.

5 ) The Bent Press ( at 3:25)

Angle your feet about 45 degrees from straight forward, turn and open your hips so that your lat muscle serves as a 'shelf' for your elbow.  As you push against the kettlebell you are actually pushing your body away, coming under the bell before standing up. 

All of these demonstrations are designed to make pressing weight easier. Read more below to find ways to make the press more difficult!

HOW DO YOU INCORPORATE THESE MOVEMENTS?

Did you know we create weekly kettlebell workouts? We have a free email list you can sign up for you receive a new kettlebell workout in your inbox every week. The workouts incorportate movements just like these ande are designed to break up the monotony of working out while increasing strength and endurance. 

Sign Up For Weekly Kettlebell Workouts

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Topics: Kettlebell Workouts, Steve Cotter, Kettlebell Technique

The Best Kettlebell Workouts For Runners

Posted by Kettlebell Kings on Feb 6, 2017 9:56:28 PM

BBrittany van Schravendijk:

Kettlebell training is an effective, appropriate, and time-efficient way for runners to prevent injury and improve performance. Running causes a lot of impact on the body each time the foot strikes the ground, and long-distance running especially can wear down the muscles and joints over hundreds of miles. Strength training can help prepare the body to resist typical overuse injuries from running, which are often the result of tight and/or weak hip, gluteal, and core muscles. Even if injury is not a concern, strength training can lead to increased speed and power, as well as increased muscular endurance. Kettlebell training specifically targets the hamstrings, glutes, back, and core all at once - areas that are notorious for causing injury in runners if they are not strengthened. Sounds like kettlebells and runners were made for each other, am I right?

Below we will go over some of the best kettlebell exercises for runners. The images show the movement and the text will highlight the important parts of the movement.  For some of the movements you can click on the name to watch a full demonstration. Lastly, we have created workouts that put it all together in order to give you some kettlebell training ideas for running. 

Single Leg Deadlift - targets hamstrings and glutes and enhances unilateral stability.

    1. Start in a standing position with a kettlebell in one hand.
    2. Reach the kettlebell for the floor by hinging at your hips and lifting the leg on the same side that you are holding the kettlebell. Keep the muscles of the lifted leg engaged by squeezing the quad and flexing your foot.
    3. Ensure back is flat, standing knee is slightly bent, and hips drive back to engage the standing leg’s hamstring and glute.
    4. After you tap the kettlebell to the floor (or however far down you can go maintaining a flat back), rise back up to standing position with control.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Goblet Squat - targets hamstrings, glutes, quads, arms, and core.

  1. Place hands on either side of the kettlebell handle and hold the kettlebell in front of the chest.

Push hips back with the chest up to come into the squat position; elbows should lightly tap the inside of the knees.

Drive through the heels and squeeze butt muscles to return back to a standing position.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Swing - targets hamstrings,

 glutes, back, and core. 

    1. Start with the kettlebell about a foot in front of you and feet hip width apart.
    2. Reach forward to grab the kettlebell handle with both hands, keeping back flat and hips up.
    3. Pull the kettlebell back between the legs, maintaining hip hinge and chest up.
    4. Rapidly extend hips by squeezing butt muscles, which will cause the hips to push the arms, and thus the kettlebell, up to chest level. Keep full body tension and an active core with a sharp exhale as you extend the hips.

 

 

Side Lunge - targets hamstrings, glutes, quads, and core.

    1. Hold a kettlebell in front of you with both hands on the handle.
    2. Step sideways and bend the leg that steps out while keeping the opposite leg straight. Keep your chest up and shoulders back. Think of this movement as a squat on one leg, while stretching the other leg out straight.
    3. Drive into the bent leg to propel yourself back to the starting position.

 

 

Read on to see Kettlebell Workouts in which we put it all together for you and give you full workouts to train with on a weekly basis!

 

Row - targets back, arms, and core.

    1. Start in a lunge stance with one leg back and the same side arm grasping a kettlebell.
    2. Retract the shoulder blade and pull the kettlebell up until elbow just passes the body. Keep the elbow tight to your side throughout the movement.
    3. Release the kettlebell back down, releasing the shoulder blade at the bottom.

Get Workouts Here:

kettlebell workouts

  

Press - targets back, shoulders, and core.

    1. Start with kettlebell in the rack position.
    2. Press the kettlebell overhead, keeping elbow in line with the shoulder the entire way up. Use an exhale to create tension and engage abdominal muscles through the challenging portion of the lift.
    3. Bring the kettlebell back to rack position.

 

 

 

Turkish Sit Up to Side Plank - targets back, shoulders, arms, glutes, and core. 

    1. Start on your back with one leg straight and one leg bent, with the foot of the bent leg flat on the floor. Legs should be about 45 degrees apart. The arm on the side of the bent leg holds a kettlebell up over the shoulder, the other arm is 45 degrees out from the body with palm facing down.
    2. Roll onto the elbow of the arm on the floor, keeping the kettlebell stabilized over the shoulder.
    3. Push up onto the hand, again moving the kettlebell up slightly to stay over the shoulder. Lift hips up as high as possible, pressing the foot of the bent leg firmly into the floor (keep the other leg straight).
    4. Release hips back down to the floor. Slowly come down to the elbow, then all the way back down to the floor. Use the arm and the core for a controlled descent.

Read on to see Kettlebell Workouts in which we put it all together for you and give you full workouts to train with on a weekly basis!

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Topics: Kettlebell Workouts, Kettlebell Workouts For Running, Kettlebell Technique

How To Seated Press With Kettlebell

Posted by Kettlebell Kings on Nov 15, 2016 10:27:48 PM

The Texas Kettlebell Academy is a frequent contributor to our blog and one of the top kettlebell academies in the United States.  Head Coach of TX Kettlebell Academy, Aaron Vyvial, was the first person in the USA to earn the rank of Master Coach under KETACADEMY and Texas Kettlebell Academy also boasts the largest collection of competition style kettlebells in the United States.  In this post, Aaron breaks down The Seated Press with kettlebells. 

The Seated Press is a great General Physical Preparation (GPP) and fitness lift but if programmed correctly, it is a great Specific Physical Preparation (SPP) for Jerk trainingWhat do these terms mean? GPP refers to physical activities that are general to any training and provide balanced conditioning in endurance, strength and flexibility, etc. So, this is another way of saying The Seated Press is a great general fitness movement which can improve the aforementioned aspects of your fitness training. SPP refers to exercises for a specific sport or goal, in this case Kettlebell Sport training, specifically for the Jerk and aspects of Long Cycle.

The Benefits:

  • Improve overhead stability
  • Elbow strength
  • Clean lockout
  • Build muscle
  • Improve cardio

In this video, MSIC Jessica Gorman, is doing a 7' set with 45 reps, only resting in the rack position. She paces herself so that she does not reach muscle or cardio failure.

 

kettlebell workouts

 

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Topics: Kettlebell Technique

Heavy Kettlebell Lifts Part 3: Windmills

Posted by Kettlebell Kings on Oct 25, 2016 12:31:00 PM

In Part 3 of our Heavy Kettlebell Series we are covering The Windmill. Oliver Quinn who collaborated with us on Part 2 is back to work with us and demonstrate in the video below.

You can find him on Instagram as @olliequinntraining, where he posts a lot of really informative and impressive posts for building strength and power.  We highly recommend you follow him for more learning on similar subjects as this. In his demonstration he will be utilizing his Kettlebell Kings 123 Pound Powder Coat Kettlebell

By Oliver Quinn:

The Windmill movement builds a number of really important aspects for heavy lifting: 
 
  • Core strength
  • Spine mobility and strength
  • Shoulder strength, stability and mobility
  • Hamstring strength and flexibility
  • Balance and coordination 

A number of these muscles are responsible for running, jumping and getting up and down all of which are required in every day life and even more so in competitive lifting. So, whether you want to compete in fitness or improve your every day life strength, this is a movement that can help.

Before trying a windmill with a kettlebell you need to make sure you have the required mobility and technique. The video below demonstrates the windmill movement without any weight used, so make sure you master the movements in the video and described below without any weight before adding your kettlebell. I recommend using the windmill stick drill as a stretch to help you work towards getting the required thoracic-spine and hamstring mobility, or use it to learn/teach the windmill.

No spinal torsion/twisting is allowed. This is not like passively picking up your car keys when you drop them! Make sure your spin stays straight through out the movement.

How to:

  1. Get the bell up overhead (on your right side) any safe way you can. Lock your arm out and pack your shoulder. A common method is a clean and press or jerk (shown below)

  2. Point your feet to the left (if the bell is in your right hand) about 30-45 degrees should do it.

  3. Look up at the kettlebell, turn your head so you can see the bell with both eyes, not just one. It helps with balance.

  4. Both shoulders should be externally rotated throughout this movement. Packed and unshrugged. Lats firing!

  5. Initiate the hip hinge by pushing your butt backwards and right, breathe in hard through your nose and pull yourself down into the hinge, front leg slightly bent and unloaded,  keep the rear leg straight and feel your hamstring and glute getting tighter as you hinge over,  simultaneously rotate your shoulders towards the kettlebell so they become stacked directly under it.

I like to imagine pulling a giant rubber band down from the ceiling with my kettlebell hand. This will keep your shoulder in its socket and connected.

       6. Maintain as much contact as possible between your left arm and left leg during this movement. This will give you constant feedback and make you feel safe and in control

       7. Pause for a few seconds at the bottom  squeeze your glutes and hamstring and come back up to the top position. 

Breathing is really important throughout, I recommend Power breathe, keep your abs braced like you are about to take a punch the whole way through! Short sharp breaths work well/or, inhale hard through your nose all the way down an exhale through your teeth all the way up to the top. Both work, the goal is to stay braced. This is demonstrated in the video.

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See video below: 

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Topics: Kettlebell Workouts, Kettlebell Technique, Heavy Kettlebell Workouts

TX KB Breakdown Of A World Champion's Snatch Technique

Posted by Kettlebell Kings on Sep 20, 2016 1:11:43 PM

In this post, Aaron Vyvial from Texas Kettlebell Academy breaks down the kettlebell snatch technique they teach at Texas Kettlebell Academy. 

The Texas Kettlebell Academy is where some of the top Kettlebell Sport athletes in the United States train. Additionally, they put on one of the great kettlebell sport events in the country each year in Austin, Texas. Kettlebell athletes from around the country and the world attend, compete and stay for additional training from world champions.  If you are looking for a kettlebell sport event to train for, we highly recommend you consider the Texas Open as one of your first events. It is hard to beat traveling to a city like Austin and you will get the opportunity to meet some of the top athletes and minds in Kettlebell Sport.

What is Kettlebell Sport?

Kettlebell sport, also known as girevoy sport (GS), is competitive kettlebell lifting. Lifters compete in mostly 10 minute sets, going for as many repetition as possible in three different lifts: Snatch, Jerk and Clean & Jerk. Athletes really need everything to compete succesfully; technique, mobility, strength, endurance and mental focus.

We have created a 4 Week Training Program You Can Sign Up For Here: 

kettlebell workouts

 

The Kettlebell Snatch is a great movement which involves a full body strength and cardio workout. You only need one kettlebell for this movement. 

We recommend most men start with 16,18 and 20 kilogram Kettlebell Sport style kettlebells and most women start with 8,12, and 16 kilogram Kettlebell Sport style kettlebells. Why this style of bells? These bells are designed for maximum comfort during high repetition exercises so that your hands, wrist and forearm lock into position comfortably and easily. They are all the same size and dimension regardless of weight so the training is uniform at all times.

By Aaron Vyvial, Texas Kettlebell Academy:

Denis Vasilev, 6x world champion and MSIC athlete has a unique but proven snatch technique that we really respect and teach to most of our athletes. It almost can be compared to long cycle, which is clean and a jerk, but with one bell and without the 'clean' movement to chest. This technique works well for athletes that compete both in biathlon (two arm events) and long cycle.

In the video below, Denis shows his slower paced snatch and then switches to his sprint or higher paced technique:

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Topics: kettlebell sport, Training Methods, Kettlebell Technique

Beginner Kettlebell Movement: Part 4 - Putting It All Together

Posted by Kettlebell Kings on Aug 20, 2016 6:03:22 PM

Kettlebell Workout

After you have mastered all of the movements in Parts 1, 2 and 3 you can put them together into a full body workout designed to strengthen your entire body and burn calories. 

This workout was put together by Brittany van Schravendijk, who walked us through the beginner movements we have covered thus far.  She put together a two part workout which involves the Kettlebell Deadlift, Kettlebell Swing and Kettlebell Squat Press.

Part 1

  • 5 Sets of 10 Deadlifts, increase weight of the kettlebell each round. Ideally by the 5th set, the last couple should be pretty challenging
  • AFTER each set, do 20 Kettlebell Swings with a moderate weight you could normally swing 25-30 times.  Rest as needed after kettlebell swings before conquering next deadlift set.

rest for four to five minutes and then do Part 2

Part 2

  • Do 6 minutes of total work
  • 30 seconds of work followed by 30 seconds of rest with a running clock do Kettlebell Squat Press. For the first two minutes do kettlebell squat presses with right arm, then two minutes of kettlebell squat presses with the left arm. End with two minutes total (30 seconds on and 30 seconds of rest) with two kettlebells doing squat presses.

We do create new kettlebell workouts you can subscribe to each week:

Sign Up For Weekly Kettlebell Workouts

 

LIKE WHAT YOU HAVE READ SO FAR? SIGN UP TO BE NOTIFIED ABOUT THIS SERIES BY ENTERING YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS IN THE SIGN UP FORM ON IN THE RIGHT COLUMN. 

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Topics: Kettlebell Workouts, Kettlebell Technique, Training Programs

Beginner Kettlebell Exercise For Women: Part 3 - Kettlebell Squat Press

Posted by Kettlebell Kings on Aug 15, 2016 4:32:11 PM

The Kettlebell Squat Press

Part 3 in our series based on beginning kettlebell movements for women is about the Kettlebell Squat Press. After this post, we will put all the movements we have gone over into a workout you can do involving all three. After mastering the Kettlebell Deadlift and the Kettlebell Swing you can move on to this latest movement. The reason it is important to first master the Kettlebell Deadlift is because some of the movements and muscles engaged are essential for performing a proper kettlebell swing and the kettlebell squat. So make sure you have that down first.

Brittany van Schravendijk, will be walking us through video tutorials of the three movements we are highlighting in this series, including this one and then helping us put them all together for a workout at the end. Brittany is a Master of Sport, World Record Holder, and National Record Holder in Kettlebell Sport. Brittany is the Head Coach of Kettlebell Sport at KOR Strength and Conditioning in San Diego, California. She has traveled all over the world to teach Kettlebell Sport workshops. Brittany is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist through the NSCA.

The video below will walk you through the correct way to execute The Kettlebell Squat Press, but here are some key points.

Why The Kettlebell Squat Press?

The Kettlebell Squat Press is a fantastic total body exercise because of all the different elements of your body you engage to perform correctly. It will involve your lower body, engaging your core and pressing at the top of the movement. Because of how the kettlebells fit on your body your momentum will be forward and this is where having great body control and core strength will have to stabilize your body. If you don't have this already, this movement will help you develop it.  Additionally, you should be able to squat deeper than with a barbell because of the positioning of the bells. The results of this exercise will be a stronger midsection, a stronger and defined figure as well as more overall strength. 

If you like what you see, we do have  a weekly workout list you can sign up for which incorporates the movements we will be going over into cardio and strength training sessions.

Sign Up For Weekly Kettlebell Workouts

The Kettlebell Squat Press:

  • Combines lower body work, upper body press with core activation
    • use core to stabilize bell overhead
  • Start by bringing the bell into the rack position (shown in video below)
  • Feet are hip width apart, weight is on heels, sink with hips level with knees or slightly lower
  • MAKE SURE to keep your elbow up and chest high to keep the core engage -- drive your body up with the heels back to standing position then press the bell overhead
  • Return to rack position and then begin your squat again
  • inhale as you come down and exhale as you go up

LIKE WHAT YOU HAVE READ SO FAR? SIGN UP TO BE NOTIFIED ABOUT THIS SERIES BY ENTERING YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS IN THE SIGN UP FORM ON IN THE RIGHT COLUMN. 

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Topics: Kettlebell Workouts, Kettlebell Technique, Training Programs, Beginner Workouts

Beginner Kettlebell Exercise For Women: Part 2

Posted by Kettlebell Kings on Jul 29, 2016 11:48:24 PM

This is Part 2 in our three part series based on beginning kettlebell movements for women. At the end of the series we will put them all together for you in a workout you can on your own! After you have mastered the Kettlebell Deadlift, you can move on to the Kettlebell Swing. The reason it is important to first master the Kettlebell Deadlift is because some of the movements and muscles engaged are essential for performing a proper kettlebell swing. So make sure you have that down first.

Our friend, Brittany van Schravendijk, will be walking us through video tutorials of the three movements we are highlighting in this series, including this one, we will be highlighting and then helping us put them all together for a workout at the end. Brittany is a Master of Sport, World Record Holder, and National Record Holder in Kettlebell Sport. Brittany is the Head Coach of Kettlebell Sport at KOR Strength and Conditioning in San Diego, California. She has traveled all over the world to teach Kettlebell Sport workshops. Brittany is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist through the NSCA.

The video below will walk you through the correct way to execute The Kettlebell Swing, but here are some key points.

Why The Kettlebell Swing?

The Kettlebell Swing may be the best all around exercise anywhere for building strength and burning fat. It will help you develop strength in your hamstrings, glutes and core which are essential in other lifts. Just like the Kettlebell Deadlift, the swing strengthens the posterior chain. As we said in Part 1, that is the group of muscles in your body which affects your ability to move. The Kettlebell Swing can be performed with one or two kettlebells for added intensity.

Posterior Chain Refresher

The posterior chain is a group of muscles consisting of tendons and ligaments on the posteriorof the body, including the biceps femoris, gluteus maximus (main extension muscle of your hips), erector spinae (straighten and rotate the back), trapezius (large muscles that cover almost your entire back), and posterior (butt). 

These muscles are responsible for running, jumping and getting up and down all of which are required in every day life. 

If you like what you see, we do have  a weekly workout list you can sign up for which incorporates the movements we will be going over into cardio and strength training sessions.

Sign Up For Weekly Kettlebell Workouts

The Kettlebell Swing:

  • back position of your swing is like the bottom position of your deadlift
    • load hamstrings and glutes to not tax lower back
  • start with the kettlebell a couple feet in front of you in order to hike it back into the swing to get momentum
  • set up like deadlift, but reach forward, hike it back into swing then push hips foward, snapping them to create explosiveness and squeeze glutes at top similar to deadlift
  • swing to the top and let the bell fall down with gravity to hips before pushing into back swing
    • IMPORTANT: wait until arms hit hips before coming back up, if you do before a lot of space is created and the load is transferred to your back
  • exhale as bell comes up to tighten glutes and engage core, exhale engages core

 

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Topics: Kettlebell Workouts, Kettlebell Technique, Training Programs, Beginner Workouts

Beginner Kettlebell Exercise For Women: MASTER THIS BEFORE ANYTHING ELSE

Posted by Kettlebell Kings on Jul 25, 2016 10:43:07 PM

MASTER THE KETTLEBELL DEADLIFT BEFORE ANY OTHER MOVEMENT

We are going to begin a three part series highlighting kettlebell movements aimed at helping women who are beginning kettlebell users get the most out of their kettlebells. At the end of the series we will put them all together for you in a workout you can on your own! Quite a number of people who have entered our contests and subscribe to our workout list have identified as beginners, so we are doing this with them in mind.  If you know anyone who you have been preaching the gospel of kettlebells to you can forward this post to them as a way to help them get started.

Our friend, Brittany van Schravendijk, will be walking us through video tutorials of the three movements we will be highlighting and then helping us put them all together for a workout at the end. Brittany is a Master of Sport, World Record Holder, and National Record Holder in Kettlebell Sport. Brittany is the Head Coach of Kettlebell Sport at KOR Strength and Conditioning in San Diego, California. She has traveled all over the world to teach Kettlebell Sport workshops. Brittany is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist through the NSCA.

The first movement we will be going over is The Kettlebell Deadlift. The video below will walk you through it, but here are some key points. Below the video we will talk about which weight to use and what style of kettlebell you should use.

Why the Kettlebell Deadlift?

The purpose of the kettlebell deadlift is to strengthen the posterior chain. What is that? It is the group of muscles in your body which affects your ability to move. Seems important.

The posterior chain is a group of muscles consisting of tendons and ligaments on the posteriorof the body, including the biceps femoris, gluteus maximus (main extension muscle of your hips), erector spinae (straighten and rotate the back), trapezius (large muscles that cover almost your entire back), and posterior (butt). 

These muscles are responsible for running, jumping and getting up and down all of which are required in every day life. The Deadlift is a great lift for overall improvement in and outside the gym.

If you like what you see, we do have  a weekly workout list you can sign up for which incorporates the movements we will be going over into cardio and strength training sessions.

Sign Up For Weekly Kettlebell Workouts

The Kettlebell Deadlift:

  • targets hamstrings, glutes and strengthens lower back
  • stand with feet hipwidth apart, right outside kettlebell
  • grab the bell while keeping our back flat and your arms straight
    • avoid rounding back and pulling with back
  • push away ground with your heels, squeeze glutes at top
  • do not use your back to lift the kettlebell(s)
  • try the suitecase deaflift after perfecting form

Kettlebell Kings has different types of kettlebells and is known for quality!

See the Bells!

LIKE WHAT YOU HAVE READ SO FAR? SIGN UP TO BE NOTIFIED ABOUT THIS SERIES BY ENTERING YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS IN THE SIGN UP FORM ON IN THE RIGHT COLUMN. 

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Topics: Kettlebell Workouts, Kettlebell Technique, Training Programs, Beginner Workouts